Good Christian Bitches

Good Christian Bitches

“It’s really strange man. All they can talk about are GCBs.”

I’m confused. I’ve heard this acronym before. It was a TV show or something that got cancelled, and then I remember.

“Good Christian Bitches?”

“Ha! What?! Noooooo….oh man that’s hilarious! Where’d you come up with that?”

“It’s a TV show…I think.”

“It stands for Gospel Centered Babes. At least that what they keep telling me.”

I consider myself fairly well-versed in the sub-culture of Christians, but this one was new to me. Christians have their own weird language that’s almost like talking in code mixed with some really cheesy phrases/hardcore doom metal lyrics (i.e. washed in the blood of the lamb anyone?)

My friend, who I’m having lunch with, is Muslim. We first met through some mutual friends and having spent extended time in the Middle East I’m attracted to their culture, customs, and especially their food. For a while I even studied the Quran so I could understand what they believe and respect their practices. This is how we ended up as friends.

“Gospel Centered Babes? What does that even mean?” I find it amusing I’m asking a Muslim to explain Christian culture to me.

“I guess it means girls who are sold out to Jesus or some crap like that. They’re hyper-focused on your Christian God so you gotta chase them down like a cheetah hunting a gazelle. They’re very elusive creatures.” He’s saying this now in a Steve Irwin, Crocodile Hunter voice. I laugh long and hard. “Honestly, Ben, I don’t know what they’re saying half the time. Most times I nod and smile. And you guys say some insane stuff. Did you know you guys believe in a ghost that lives in your body?” I’m laughing hysterically now.

“Don’t get me wrong, I love them and they’re my best friends and great roommates, but…..sometimes I feel like a project…….” His voice drops and there’s an air of sadness around it. “One of my roommates told me that you’re not truly a Christian if you’re not quoting Scripture all the time….so I get to hear a lot of your sacred texts often. Is that true?”

My blood is boiling and my urge-to-kill meter is rising steadily. Here my beautiful Muslim friend has been held down and had Jesus smeared in his face. Cake is delicious when you get to eat it, but when you get it thrown in your face it quickly becomes annoying or a joke (like clowns) and you can’t blame someone for becoming hostile when they’re cramming cake in your face.

I point to the table next us enjoying their food.

“You see those 2 guys sitting there?” He nods. “What if we became friends with them and discovered they were Star Wars fanatics. And at first, we like them, but they keep telling us about how Star Wars is the greatest movie ever. So we go and watch all the Star Wars movies with them because we’re friends and that’s what friends do for one another. They grill us afterwards on what we thought of the movie and we think it’s cool, but not as great as they’ve made it out to be, and so they try more and more to convince us how awesome Star Wars really is. Every word out of their mouth becomes about Darth Vader, the Force…this invisible entity that governs the universe, Luke Sywalker, Boba Fett, and EVERY damn day we have to hear about it.  How old do you think that’s going to get? And do you really think we’ll ever like Star Wars? Or will we grow to resent it and hate it?”

“I suppose we’d hate it.”

“Welcome to Christian sub-culture 101. Just replace the words Vader, Skywalker, and Star Wars with Satan, Jesus, and the Bible. You now understand why so many Christians suck to be around. They can’t even speak your language, let alone relate to you. They force you to know their culture instead of getting to know yours and then are shocked when you don’t agree or understand what they’re talking about never realizing that all of this means nothing and is completely foreign and weird to someone who’s not well-versed in it.”

He’s thinking it over and I can see him processing, so I jump to my point.

“In Islam you believe Jesus, al-Masih, is a prophet that loved the people of Israel through his actions and teachings, correct?”

“Yes. He was a wonderful man and miracle worker who followed the teaching of Allah”.

“So how many Christians actually look like Jesus in their actions and speech?”

But he already knows the answer…..

 

If you do a Google search for “Christians are” and let it autofill your search this is what you’ll get:

GOOGLE-Christians-are

 

Similarly, if you type “Stars Wars fans are” this is what you get:

Star-Wars

Aren’t the parallels interesting between the two?

When you exhaust your energy trying to speak a language most people don’t understand, or let alone care about, you alienate them. Think about how confusing Christianity REALLY is. The best way I’ve seen it explained in the eyes of someone who’s not a Christian is like this:

Christianity

Makes sense?
Hardly.

And yet that description is EXACTLY what you sound like to someone when you come off as the proverbial “pushy Star Wars fan” especially if you spend your time trying to quote a book at them they have no interest in reading. If you’re a Christian, have you ever noticed in the Bible that Jesus never once quotes Scripture to any one except the religious Pharisees, Sadducees, and the Devil? He instead talks in parables. Isn’t it interesting that the Apostle Paul, when he goes to Athens and talks at a pagan temple doesn’t quote scripture but instead uses their own poets and scribes?

We selfishly assume everyone should know and follow what we believe instead of spending time getting to know and friend those different from us. Everything’s an agenda, and people can sniff agendas a mile away. And so Christians separate themselves from those different than them and form their own sub-culture instead of engaging and looking like Jesus. And tell me we haven’t managed to create the dumbest subculture in the world. We are the biggest and most blatant thieves in culture and yet are somehow repulsed by it? It’s amazing we aren’t getting sued all the time. We steal from pop culture, sprinkle Christ dust on it, and call it ours like we invented it. We have our own t-shirts, TV stations, music, movies, books, and art that is nothing more than rips offs of what’s already been done. We just steal everyone else’s ideas and change the wording on it.

cheesy_tshirts

There used to be a time when Christians were intellectually smart and were on the forefront of scientific breakthrough (Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus). They were masterful storytellers and authors (JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis). They were respected philosophers (Søren Kierkegaard). They were the leading artists (Michelangelo, Raphael, Donatello – not the Ninja Turtles, the Renaissance painters). Now we’re content being culture bandits and everyone can see the hypocrisy in it.

Google tells the truth.  We have become our own self-fulfilling prophecy. We are content being Good Christians Bitches to the world around us.

So to the agnostic, atheist, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu, or whoever reading this I would encourage you, don’t tolerate this behavior. Demand more of Christians. Don’t simply complain about them on the internet or Reddit, confront them when their attitudes and actions don’t resemble that of the man they claim to follow. You’ll be able to tell who the true followers are by their attitudes, actions, and response to you. It should be one seasoned with grace, empathy, and concern.

And to my brothers and sisters? I leave you with this:  And the second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ 

Communicator, writer, speaker, and a college pastor for Gateway Church in Austin, TX. Veteran of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and recipient of the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. Most passionate about Jesus, his wife, art, tattoos, and Texas BBQ (in that order).
  • Brandon Crosby

    Freaking money. Well said bro.

  • Israel

    Oh, this is just what I wanted and was afraid to say! Thnak you so much!

  • http://www.facebook.com/aaron.grosch Aaron Grosch

    Nailed, it.

  • JB

    This was hard to swallow as I’ve been so excited coming to know Christ more that he’s all I want to talk about. I’ve lost some people in my life that I hoped could find Him because of this though. I’ve discussed it with other Christians and have learned to realize it’s about showing them His love and not necessarily having to tell them unless they choose to discuss it. I’m learning to talk 5% of the time and listen 95%. Thank you for this reality check!

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      Man that is really awesome to hear. I’ve found that the more I let people bring it up, the more I have a chance to talk about it than I ever have. Listening is the key and definitely a lost art. Keep after it man!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000432728758 Cameron Tejas Mauldin

    So incredibly on point. This article sums up how I feel about Christians today, and it’s such a shame too.
    Be the change you hope to see

  • http://www.facebook.com/thomas.wilson.946954 Thomas Wilson

    Dat message doe. Definitely one everyone who calls themselves a Christian needs to hear. At my university, we have a fire-and-brimstone preacher named Brother Micah, and he is exactly as I described him: fire and brimstone upon you, unless you come to Christ. It’s painful to see him 1. spreading the message in the wrong tone, and 2. getting mocked by the crowd that shows up like he’s some sort of public spectacle. So sad…

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      We just had the same thing happen at SXSW here in Austin. I wanted to be like, “NOT ALL OF US ARE LIKE THIS!!!” But even if I had said that, the overwhelming majority has seen different actions from Christians. My hope is we begin to live in such a crazy, sacrificial way that is so loving that people can spot the frauds among the Christian community

  • Trent

    Wow. This is great :D

  • http://www.facebook.com/alovesopure77 Jonathan Violassi

    I’ve felt this way very much myself, but have never been able to put my frustration into words. I hate how us, we, Christians have made the Gospel cheap. We’ve cheapened its message and the Cross of Christ. I remember once reading a story of a couple who came into a Christian bookstore and found a piggybank with the words “Jesus Saves” on it. Jesus does save. He saves us hopelessly depraved sinners by exchanging His own life for ours. Its not a cute little catchphrase, or something to just throw on a bumper-sticker. I guess that’s why Christian cliches have always irked me. I’m glad you share in this frustration, I’d like to think its something good to be frustrated about.

    I’ve been reading a lot of Timothy Keller’s The Reason for God. Its an amazing book, and its helped me cope tremendously with a lot of the injustices within the Church. Keller makes the point that radical, fanaticism in Christianity is not quoting the most Bible verses or being the most zealous, over-bearing Christian, but in fact fanatical Christianity is being completely like Christ by extreme amounts of love, humility, servitude, and compassion. Over-bearing ,obnoxious, self-righteous Christianity is actually birthed out of not being devoted to God and devoted to what He values. Anyways, I thought it was interesting. Thanks for the post Sledge!

  • david hewell

    The pendulum can swing both ways. On one hand, to just be screaming Jesus in someone’s face without true love (which you can only find in Christ) is only a bunch of noise. On the other hand, the old “bait and switch” leads to a watered down truth, that isn’t really truth at all. The Holy Spirit is the one that brings someone to salvation, not you being a buddy or the guy on the street corner. Prayer and acting with the love and patience that God shows you are the acts of a regenerate heart/someone following Jesus. So do what God has called you to do, but do it with God’s love. Otherwise its just a bunch of noise in an already noise filled society.

    • allan h

      Ain’t that the truth. Our aims ain’t to be buddies but love people like family. I hate the number of times I’ve turned loving into methodology, mission. Loving starts in the presence of God and comprehending, appreciating the grace, mercies and goodness of his nature. Love God, then you can love your neighbour

  • Ben

    Thanks for another great post Sledge!

  • http://www.facebook.com/cory.derossett Cory Robert DeRossett

    Man, this message is profound and well-said. After being in and out I’ve seen the good, the bad, and ugly of Christian sub-culture.

  • Tim

    It’s so sad nowadays how most Christians are like: “Hey look at me, I’m a Christian!” then not 20 seconds later they’re cussing out some kid who bumped into them and made them spill their coffee. I don’t really like having cake being shoved in my face either. So I generally try to stay away from cake shoving. And honestly the more I see “I’m a Christian” then 2 minutes later: “YOU LITTLE ******* YOU- blah blah blah”. It honesty makes me want to punch them in the face, drag them to the side, and start asking them why they did that but not 2 minutes before they were sharing the love of Jesus. It’s pathetic.

  • Christine

    Wow…this blog post was so timely for me. Currently going through a similar situation with my brother. Thanks, Ben!

  • http://twitter.com/raisingagamer raisingagamer

    Not to take away from these awesome and telling points, but I keep reading alot about this point of view. I mostly share this point of view. So what are we Christians, going to do about it? Judging all our ignorant brothers isn’t God’s way either. Sometimes your neighbor is the annoying Christianese guy.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      I completely agree! And the church will always be made up of hypocrites, which should make us somewhat joyful in seeing that we can all be broken and busted. However, the problem remains that these Pharisaical attitudes and actions remain within much of the church in general. And so scripture does give us answers as how to handle it. It’s called rebuke. But here’s the problem. Most of us are content being cowards because we don’t want to ruffle feathers or have their biting words come back at us and so we let this behavior continue unchecked. By not calling out our brothers and sisters when it becomes pervasive then we walk in sin. And the issue with the people I’m pointing out is that they build a coalition that agrees with them instead of taking the accusation seriously. If I could encourage you in any way relationally, it would be to limit the amount of cowards you put around you. That might sound like common sense, but I know very few people who put in that type of work to invite people in to engage you, and watch who actually does it. To surround your life with people who are willing to go, “That’s not right. What you did there is not right.” If we lived more like this then we’d have a lot less of the annoying Christianese guys hanging around. Make sense?

  • Grant

    The one youtube video that kept coming to mind as I read this and the comments was “the atheists’ worst nightmare.” I seriously can’t stand what a ridiculous argument it is for creationism. I understand that as Christians we’re not suppose to judge one another either, but I really wish Christians like the dude in the video could just realize how their approach of evangelizing is more harmful than good. The video now literally only feeds the community he was trying to reach, and is only used for the purpose of showing how stupid Christians are rather than ever being used for its original intent. As a Christian, how do you even counter those who try to do good for Christianity and yet only seem to hinder its image? I mean, what they say is most likely funnier/easier to make fun of than that of those who are living out the sacrificial lifestyle, thus will get popularized and thrown around the internet. And those that you hope would create the separation of frauds and real Christians are overlooked and just thrown back into the stereotype that Christians are [blank]…(This seems to be the case, unless of course a nonbeliever actually has a personal connection with a “real” Christian. Also, I’m talking strictly internet/media wise in terms of how Christians would be portrayed as a whole.) It might seem harsh, and again, I’m not trying to be judgmental, but it’s just the truth that some Christians, while their heart is in the right place, need to stop writing their horrible “Christian” music or keep making youtube videos. They might reach a few, but they’re turning off a lot more…Sorry if this post seems pretty negative; I’m more so just concerned about the issue, that’s all.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      See the answer that I gave to @twitter-388285279:disqus

  • http://www.facebook.com/yellowsparrow77 Tyler Chase

    This should be encouraging to Christians. This should cause them to actually engage in the culture and try to understand the ways of others. I feel like Christians have turned everything into ‘projects’ like you have stated. I love my church, but like many other churches, we do have our problems. However, now that I am in a position of leadership, I told the church that: “When I was younger it was really hard to speak out when I thought something was wrong, but now that I am in a position of leadership I’m not going allow those things to happen.” I also told them to let me know when I was doing something wrong, because my intentions aren’t very clear; heck I actually encourage it. I want to grow in Christ—what that means is being apart of his body and learning to work with others. If the church is a body, that means that we should fix what is wrong. A body repairs. For example, when you have a broken leg, the body doesn’t ignore it; it repairs it. So should that be our duty as well?

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      That’s beautiful sister! And yes! That was exactly the reason I wrote it, to encourage and rebuke so we can heal. Nailed it and loved what you had to say!

  • Bex

    Exactly how I feel :) There’s nothing wrong with evangelising but doing it in a non cake-in-the-face kinda way is so important. I’m crap at reading Bible/knowing verses, but I think the biggest way we can show our faith and get people wanting god is to just be ourselves and be real. To paraphrase Jesus – let people know we are Christians by the love that we show to others and how we deal with the crap life throws at us, not by how many quotes that we know and can shout at people…

  • http://www.facebook.com/cullen.petrey Cullen Petrey

    For the love of god, change the name so I can Facebook this. Most of the discussion people I know won’t even read it for the title.

  • MNHardcoreKid

    Finally, a Christian article that is challenging but not condescending. I could say “ohhh preach it brother” like I’m on the same page as you, connecting with other people’s lives when I witness, but truth be told I could be doing much better. We all could. So instead will say “Good message, sir,” take it to heart, and work on how I interact as a Christian with my non-Christian friends.

  • Justin Stephens

    Thank you for this. I really enjoyed the analogies; they were very appropriate to contemporary evangelism. I will keep this in mind as I do life with my Jewish friend.

  • http://twitter.com/jesixneaves Jesi Neaves

    …DUDE! super rad! love this spot.

  • Mj Schmid

    I agree with your sentiments regarding the largely irrelevant Christian subculture. But, respectfully, we can’t forget the Great Commission. It’s important to engage our culture, but only as a means to the end of reaching them with the Gospel. Jesus didn’t call us primarily to dialogue, but to disciple-making.
    If we look at the work of Christ and the early church in Acts, yes, they were culturally relevant. But their primary work was in teaching dying sinners about the grace of God by talking about him and talking about him some more, everywhere they went. I would hate to see joy-filled Christians who are excited to talk about Jesus discouraged from doing so for the sake of cultural relevance, because the fact is that the true Gospel will never be totally accepted by our culture. Jesus promised that faithful Christians would make enemies (Matt 10:22).

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      I agree! But don’t forget the Great Commission is to “go and make disciples” not evangelize. In order to accomplish this Incarnation (looking like Jesus) must precede proclamation (evangelism): In other words, Grace must precede truth if we are to model our lives after John 1:14 and be incarnational in the way of Jesus.

      Whenever we share our opinion about someone else’s lives without significant trust or relational bandwidth, it comes across as condemnation. Since Jesus didn’t come to condemn but to save, we must learn the skill and patience of winning the trust of those we hope to influence.

      This type of scenario where I’ve had to wait for an open door has happened a lot to me and it often leads to the non-Christian friend pursuing relationship, dialogue, conversation and a discipleship relationship. When the relationship is closed off, nothing will ever move spiritually, but if we gain trust through blessing and presence in the lives of people, then hope is always one conversation away.

      If you become of friend of someone, you’ll know their true story, and if you know their true story, you’ll understand their sin, and when you understand their sin, you’ll know how to pray, and when you know how to pray, God will show you your own sin and how to love, and when you love, and keep loving, and keep loving, they will want to know what you think, and then you will speak truth, and they will want to hear, and they will want to know your God, and God will change their heart, and then He will help them change the way they live.

      • Mj Schmid

        Well said brother. Thanks for the response.

    • Brock Johnson

      What’s funny is how much scrutiny I would get for reposting this because the word “bitch” is offensive. Really good though. As Christians we generally don’t think enough about what we say. The question we need to ask ourselves is: “would this point someone to Christ or push them further from him.”

  • garrenteed

    I think this article acquires it’s substance because it is an easy target on which to pick. I don’t agree with living a Bible belt lifestyle as described above, but if we think that is the reason Christians have assumed so many names similar to those seen on Google, then are eyes are clearly blinded. Neither is the conclusion to become intellectual the solution, citing (doubtfully theologian) scholars from different time periods, well suited to solve our societal label. Rather, Ben, I think you have half the point but you fail run with it in your exposition: Love the Lord your God (the half you’re missing) and love your neighbor as yourself. I would love to read a respectable article with your thoughts on how to practically enable these concepts.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      I would encourage you to read my response to Mj Schmid here in the comments section as I think it will answer your question.

  • John

    The title for this should be changed, I typed heartsupport into google, and this came up. What a terrible impression this gave. Terribly named article.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      Yeah good point. That’s not what we want popping up under google when they search for us, however, due to the popularity of the post it did and the blog was named as such and connected with the audience, so changing it is something we don’t want to do. Instead, we’re creating a site map so key pages pop-up and this is removed from google and has been demoted as a sitelink by our webmaster.

      Our intent was not to offend but inform and bring very real realities to the community at large in the way we want to treat our neighbors.

  • whitney

    I have to applaud you for how well written this was. And how you were able to say this whit out it seeming to offend. And thank you for the insight.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      Thank you Whitney! I really was trying to point people to the fact we continue to look more like Pharisees often in our behavior than like Jesus and do it in a graceful way to call out the older brother. Thanks for reading!!

  • STagoric

    Christianity is not a Religion, it is a state of mind. If you read and understand the Bible and its message of Good News then you also understand that it’s so metaphysically enlightening and physically emancipating that you MUST share it with any/all who have ears. Churches of today are not the called out assembly that worship our Lord, they are social hierarchies with all their concomitant behavioral symptoms. Preachers should teach the everlasting forgiveness paid for by the “Blood of the Lamb”, not chastise us into humble submission by pointing to each of us with the finger of accusation.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      I would agree with what you have said except that it is important to remind one another at times where we are falling short. A recent survey by the Barna Group show’s that only 14% of Christians (FOURTEEN PERCENT!) have the attitudes and actions of Jesus (here’s the link: https://www.barna.org/barna-update/faith-spirituality/611-christians-more-like-jesus-or-pharisees#.UtB4r2RDvhc)

      In the Scriptures Paul repeatedly called out the church (hence Corinthians and Galatians as well as most of his new testament epistles) and even called out Peter to his face for his Pharisaical actions in associating only with the Judaizers. The point of this article was to remind Christians that we should be loving God and loving our neighbors and the rest like culture and silly things we do to create a subculture that alienates isn’t really following the Greatest Commandment. If we love our neighbor as ourself we’re going to learn how to speak to them, engage them, pray for them, and befriend them. Conversion will naturally take place out of those things with God being the one to change their hearts. This wasn’t an article to chastise by accusation, but to point out where we are horribly falling short

  • PMJr

    I’ve had so many people disagree with me about this article. I love it. The people I showed are just hate fueled individuals who like to shove religion down others throats and want no questioning about it. They actually stopped halfway and said this is absurd. I just told them to finish it and they went back to the way they always have been. It’s a shame they can’t learn because they’re afraid to question and listen. Again thank you for this article, I truly loved it.

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      It is sad indeed and I’ve encountered much of this mentality where people have the attitudes and actions of Pharisees than of a love that looks like Jesus. But don’t forget that even the Father entreated the older brother to come in and celebrate in the story of the prodigal. While they are difficult people, let’s not forget they need just as much love and to be saved out of religion as do people who are horribly lost. They’re just lost in a completely different way.

  • Gabriel

    This does not line up with scripture, there is no point to this article unless you want to promote silence. The Bible promises hate towards us in John 15:18-25 and if you’re not experiencing any persecution then that is not a good thing. It is very important to preach the Gospel: Romans 1:16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. Sometimes it’s more loving tell others the truth so they can receive Jesus and get rejected than to be accepted and let people go to hell. The more the people of God stood up the more they were hated Isaiah was sawed in two, John was exiled… ect… The fact is most people do not like the “cake” and sure we are supposed to present the gospel in love and not just robotically quotes scriptures. We are supposed to try and relate to them, but we not supposed to suppress the gospel

    • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

      Funny enough I have Romans 1:16 tattooed on my ribcage. If I was ashamed about it, I wouldn’t have necessarily wrote this article either. It’s true that we’ll experience persecution and suffering, but that doesn’t mean we should rejoice in it when we’re being a jerk to people about it with our faith. Instead we’re supposed to lovingly engage them.

      As a pastor this is something I’ve long struggled with because I want to push Jesus, Jesus, Jesus all day, but we live in an increasingly post-Christian world and we want these people to find hope and healing and actually meet Jesus and not be ran off by perceived overzealousness or an inability to relate to their problems when they don’t see Jesus as an answer or especially hell. Those relationships take time. And let’s be straight. God didn’t create heaven for people that are afraid of hell, so that methodology rarely works.

      Think of it like this. Most people want to be the Apostle Peter at Pentecost in Acts 2. He starts preaching and drops conviction like a bomb (“This Jesus whom you crucified”). The Holy Spirit moves and 3,000 people get saved. That’s awesome and I’d love for it to happen more, but is not always effective. Most pastors and street preachers go for this method though.

      However, everyone forgets about Paul at Mars Hill in Acts 17. Paul walks into a pagan temple (where I’m sure there was demonic activity), strolls around, and finds an idol to an “Unknown God” and then builds a bridge saying, “This Unknown God? I know him and let me tell you”. If you read in Acts 17 you’ll notice he never once says the name of Jesus and instead uses their own pagan poets and scribes saying, “What these guys are saying is true, but is about this unknown God that can be known”. Which means if he was quoting it, he was reading it and knew it by heart. What is the result of this? Some of them think he’s crazy, some are curious, and a few join the ranks and become Christians. However, what’s the END result? Paul becomes the most prolific evangelist and converts most of the known world and writes 70% of the new testament.

      My point is that sometimes love, kindness and building that bridge to connect in a post christian world takes longer, but reflects Jesus more than going, “Yay, someone told me I was a moron because I love Jesus” when we were the ones ramming our beliefs in their face and never getting the time to care for and love them the way Christ did.

      • Gabriel

        Love and kindness are always important when sharing with someone, though sometimes love can look like a hug or a warning it still can be love if the Holy Spirit is leading you. In Acts 2, 3000 people got saved because of the Holy Spirit, which is something I lack a lot of times, which why I often lack power. If you want to be effective, the Holy Spirit must move.

        Okay, to address Roman 1:16 it is important to note that this verse does not just address that he was unashamed, but he realized that the gospel was the power of God for salvation.

        Acts 17:18 “Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also conversed with him. And some said, “What does this babbler wish to say?” Others said, “He seems to be a preacher of foreign divinities”—because he was preaching Jesus and the resurrection”. This was directly before the speech he gave about the unknown god. He couldn’t not preach about Jesus and the gospel because he knew that “It is the power of God for salvation”. He was preaching the gospel everyday up until that very moment.

        God loves people, He doesn’t want them to go to hell and the power to prevent them is through the power of God, the gospel. God loves you and He loves me, I will pray that He gives us greater revelation of how to share Himself with others.

        • http://www.heartsupport.com/ Benjamin Sledge

          “I will pray that He gives us greater revelation of how to share Himself with others.” I think that’s the key man and like that you put it this way. And yes, the gospel will always be evident when the spirit moves

  • Amber

    Beautifully written. Felt the wait of this in my own life as I, myself was falling into this sub-culture. It left me resenting a lot of the the “Christian-culture” for a while. I felt like I was only surrounding myself with Christian people, only going to Christian events, and only ever talking about Christian things. I was drained and tired of it, it wasn’t me. Since then I’ve been able to balance my life more. (With trying to keep Jesus at the center… Not the culture of Christianity). Thanks for sharing, reinforces what I was feeling last year!

  • Geert

    Thankyou for this. You have put to words, what I have felt for a long while now. I really, really, really dislike Christian subculture and its hypocricy. We all have these witty one-liners and clever quotes, but that doesn’t help anybody. We really succeeded in isolating ourselves from society, instead of being a part of it, and loving each and everyone in it.